Rembrandt, Vermeer & The Dutch Golden Age

    Masterpieces From The Leiden Collection And The Musée du Louvre
    Louvre Abu-Dhabi
    14th February-18th May
    words: Rebecca Dickson

    The Louvre Abu Dhabi is quickly becoming one of the world’s most exciting art galleries.  This latest show marks its first truly international exhibition; complimenting the Museum’s ethos to ‘focus on what unites us’; and reflecting their belief that the story of human creativity transcends individual cultures and civilisations.

    Displaying stunning paintings and drawings, the exhibition has been curated to take us on an artistic journey, lead by Rembrandt and Vermeer, through Leiden and Amsterdam, during the Dutch Golden Age. We even get to feast our eyes on Johannes Vermeer’s Young Woman Seated at a Virginal, from The Leiden Collection and The Lacemaker from the Musée du Louvre. These two beautiful paintings hang beside each other for the first time in 300 years, having originally been cut from the same bolt of canvas.

    Rembrandt van Rijn, Self-Portrait with Shaded Eyes (1634). © The Leiden C.

    The people of the Netherlands became world leaders in trade, science and the arts, which has been reflected in the sophisticated curation by Blaise Ducos, Chief Curator of Dutch and Flemish paintings at the Musée du Louvre; and Lara Yeager-Crasselt, Curator of The Leiden Collection and a specialist in seventeenth-century Dutch and Flemish art.  As Blaise Ducos declared “During the 17th century, exceptional economic, social and political circumstances enabled one country, The Republic of the United Provinces, to become the world’s leading economic power. The Dutch were living in what they considered a ‘Golden Age’. In this context, major artistic figures like Rembrandt or Vermeer flourished. Through the confrontation of masterpieces from the Musée du Louvre and The Leiden Collection, this exhibition tells this extraordinary story. This show does not intend to provide a panorama of Dutch painting in the 17th century, but by mentioning different glimpses, first and foremost through Leiden’s sight; it refers to the culture of artistic exchange within which Vermeer worked.”

    Johannes Vermeer, The Lacemaker (ca. 1669-70) © RMN-Grand Palais (musée d.
    www.louvreabudhabi.ae
    • Show Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    comment *

    • name *

    • email *

    • website *

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    Ads

    ads

    You May Also Like

    Auckland Castle Re-Opens Its Doors

    On Saturday November 2nd, more than 1,000 people joined in a day of celebrations ...

    Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition

    Design Museum. London. Until 15th September   Kubrick is, without a doubt, one of ...

    WILLIAM BLAKE

    Tate Britain, London William Blake must be seen as one of the greatest Britons ...

    Desiring Machines

    Desiring Machines offers a refreshing perspective on kinetic sculpture with a visual experience blending ...

    The Remarkable Story of Humanity’s Quest to Measure Time 

    Time Tamed From the introduction, Nick Foulkes’s enticing choice of words seduces the reader ...

    Pierre Bonnard – The Colour of Memory

    Never has London been more exciting as it will be in 2019 The Tate ...

    Impressionist Art Sale

    Egon Schiele and Vincent Van Gogh to star in impressionist and modern art sale ...

    Ingmar Bergman’s Persona

    Without any doubt, Ingmar Bergman is one of the best film directors of the ...

    Honorato Del Hierro

    Brilliant, modest, and with a great sense of humour, Honorato del Hierro is an ...

    This website uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you accept our use of cookies.